Posted by: atowhee | February 20, 2016

WHAT DO DUCKS AND BIRDERS TRULY ENJOY?

Open sewer ponds.  Like in the small town of Yamhill.

First two images: blooming tree (a plum?) and female Brewer’s Blackbird.  Their red-winged cousins are already singing and flashing those epaulets to impress the females.

BLOOMBRB MOM (1280x960)DUCK MANNY (1280x960)LS (1280x960)SOSP LOOK (1280x960)SOSP SONG (1280x960)SOSP SONG2 (1280x960)WOOD-PBG (1280x960)WOOD-TWO (1280x960)

Note in the next-to-last image a Pied-billed Grebe swims behind the Wood Duck and scaup.  I had missed that bird when I scanned with my binocs (not carrying my scope) so the camera gets credit for that species.

Yamhill Sewage Ponds (restricted access), Yamhill, Oregon, US
Feb 19, 2016 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM.  19 species

Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)  15
Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata)  4
Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis)  60
Bufflehead (Bucephala albeola)  40
Acorn Woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus)  1
Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens)  1
Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus)  8
Western Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma californica)  4
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)  3
White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis)  1
Bewick’s Wren (Thryomanes bewickii)  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula)  1
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)  50
Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis)  100
Golden-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia atricapilla)  3
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)  1
Spotted Towhee (Pipilo maculatus)  3
Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus)  12
Brewer’s Blackbird (Euphagus cyanocephalus)  4

Yamhill Sewage Ponds (restricted access), Yamhill, Oregon, US
Feb 20, 2016 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM.  17 species

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)  2
Wood Duck (Aix sponsa)  4
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)  15
Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata)  20
Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis)  80
Bufflehead (Bucephala albeola)  40;        Pied-billed Grebe
Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)  1
Eurasian Collared-Dove (Streptopelia decaocto)  X
Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura)  3
Acorn Woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus)  1
Western Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma californica)  3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula)  1
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)  15
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)  X
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)  1
Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus)  6

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Responses

  1. Hi – the flowering “tree” is Indian Plum, Oemleria cerasiformis (used to be genus Osmaronia). It’s one of the earliest bloomers here in the PNW, and is important as an early-season source of nectar for hummingbirds, moths and butterflies, native bees, etc. It’s also used a lot in Pacific Northwest restoration projects due to its ease of propagation, rapid growth, and wide tolerances for various shade and moisture regimes. Nice shot of it!


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