Posted by: atowhee | August 11, 2017

BUGS BOUNTIFUL, STOICAL OAKS

AUG. 11
There are plenty of bugs in every possible natural niche right now. So for bug eaters (that would be insects and spiders, not the true “bugs” of entomology) this is a season of plenty. Today at Yamhill Sewer Ponds there were two swallow species, three shorebird species, wood-pewee, swift and woodpecker—all favor the heady flavors of the arthropods. The pewee:pewe fence
The shorebirds: Spotted Sandpiper with spots, Greater Yellowlegs with yellow legs:SS-YAMSS-YAM2TWO SHORETWO SHORE2
Some of the other Yamhill birds today:BE-YAMHEagle above, Lesser Goldfinch below.LEGO-YAMRAVN-YAMHRaven above, Robin on fence.ROB WIRE
The oaks this time of year are solid, stolid, stout and redoubtable. Drought, pshaw. Heat, yeah, so? Other plants are dropping leaves, wilting in dry and hot, some even changing leaf color. Oaks are so stoical. Over 300 true oak species found across the temperate parts of the planet and even in high elevations in tropics…but not in Australia or New Zealand. Acorns don’t travel well across salt water. Acorns are planted by jays and their relatives, squirrels and their relatives, and we know from little acorns, mighty…
Did you know that oak root systems are often three times larger (or even more) than the spread of the tree above ground? Did you know that many oak groves are small family groups? Several large trunks can come up from a single root network. Even when a trunk is cut down, the underground roots will live on, connected through root fibers to other trees that still have their limbs and leaves. Thus the decapitated oak lives on, contributing soil nutrients and water. It is repaid with products of photosynthesis from those trunks with their above ground factories in tact. Oaks don’t form a forest, they form a community.STOIC OAKSTOIC2IMG_3521
Here are two finches on our garden feeder: American Gold, House:2FINCH2FINCH2
NUTHATCH YOGA ON OUR DAWN REDWOOD’S TRUNKIMG_3442IMG_3444IMG_3449IMG_3467
THE EVER HUNGRY NEIGHBORIMG_3614

Yamhill Sewage Ponds (restricted access), Yamhill, Oregon, US
Aug 11, 2017 10:10 AM – 10:55 AM. 22 species

Mallard (Northern) (Anas platyrhynchos platyrhynchos/conboschas) X
Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura) 3
Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) 1
Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) 1
Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla) 12
Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularius) 6
Greater Yellowlegs (Tringa melanoleuca) 1
Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis) 1
Eurasian Collared-Dove (Streptopelia decaocto) X
Vaux’s Swift (Chaetura vauxi) 1
Downy Woodpecker (Pacific) (Picoides pubescens gairdnerii/turati) 1
Western Wood-Pewee (Contopus sordidulus) 1
California Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma californica) 4
Common Raven (Corvus corax) 2 first of season at this location
Violet-green Swallow (Tachycineta thalassina) 25
Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) 12
American Robin (Turdus migratorius) 14
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) X
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) 1
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) 2
Brewer’s Blackbird (Euphagus cyanocephalus) 1
Lesser Goldfinch (Spinus psaltria) 7

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